Narrative Therapy: “I’ve heard it said when you know better, you do better. What do you know better? What do you do better?”

Narrative Therapy: “I’ve heard it said when you know better, you do better. What do you know better? What do you do better?”

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“I’ve heard it said when you know better, you do better. What do you know better? What do you do better?”

I know I could have done better. I could have listened to my parents, but I’d get mad and do what I wanted to. They tried to help me, but I was after instant gratification. Now I know it’s all in my attitude. I work on that and on patience. With those I can make changes. —M., NJRC Client

One thing I know now that I’m older is what I call reframing. I stop. I step away. In that time I can choose to change the negative into positive. —T., NJRC Client

I have learned a few things over the years. 1. Be more private. 2. Everyone is not my friend. 3. Put myself on the pedestal. 4. Not everyone wants to improve. 5. You show your company’s reality. (You choose the company). —A., NJRC Client

I make mistakes. I got caught up in a life and left my support system. I left college for the environment in the streets. I took some morals with me; there were things I wouldn’t do. I was young. I had cousins and uncles I looked up to. Everything looks good when you are young, and then, I was behind bars. I know better now. I’m back in college and looking to make it better. —J., NJRC Client

I’ve been incarcerated for five years and in two months, I will be back in the world. I have changed my thinking and how I look at things. I don’t want to go back. I have to stay positive and do the right things. I have addictions. We always think of addiction as drugs, but there are many areas – smoking, lying, cheating. These become habits that cause me and others sorrow and pain. I’m nearly a senior citizen now and I’m tired of being tired, so I’m changing my ways. —T., NJRC Client

I was taught the right thing, but I chose the other. I didn’t have to choose it. I went to the streets early and the manipulation game was introduced to me at a very young age. Parents blame themselves, but it’s not their fault. I was hustling and everything was excess. It doesn’t last and then you’re in jail being told when to eat, when to sleep, when to use the toilet. Change comes when the pain gets great enough. True, genuine people will give you help, not a package. Inside I had all the answers. The thing to do now is apply them to my life and teach them. Turn my attention to acquiring knowledge; not the materialistic things that come and go. —J., NJRC Client

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